Category Archives: Literary Culture

  • Allegory, the áes dána and the Liberal Arts in Medieval Irish Literature

    5 July 2016 | 12:51 pm

    ‘Allegory, the áes dána and the Liberal Arts in Medieval Irish Literature’, in Grammatica, Gramadach and Gramadeg: Vernacular Grammar and Grammarians in Medieval Ireland and Wales, ed. Deborah Hayden and Paul Russell (Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016), pp. 11-34 The present study briefly considers the vernacular terminology used to describe figurative language in medieval Irish literature, and […]

  • Senchas Gall Átha Clíath: Aspects of the Cult of St Patrick in the Twelfth Century

    5 July 2016 | 12:44 pm

    (co-authored with Liam Breatnach), ‘Senchas Gall Átha Clíath: Aspects of the Cult of St Patrick in the Twelfth Century’, in Sacred Histories: A Festschrift for Máire Herbert, ed. J. Carey, K. Murray & C. Ó Dochartaigh (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015), pp. 22-55 This Festschrift contribution comprises the first edition, translation and detailed discussion of Senchas […]

  • De tribus habitaculis animae: Concerning the Three Dwelling-Places of the Soul

    5 July 2016 | 11:43 am

    English translation of the Latin treatise De tribus habitaculis animae. (Note that the PDF published here is of the pre-publication proofs.) De_tribus_habitaculis_animae_Concerning

  • On the Wonders of Ireland: Translation and Adaptation

    4 July 2016 | 12:06 pm

    ‘On the Wonders of Ireland: Translation and Adaptation’, in Authorities and Adaptations: the Reworking and Transmission of Textual Sources in Medieval Ireland, ed. Elizabeth Boyle & Deborah Hayden (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014), pp. 233-61 Taking the Latin poem De mirabilibus Hiberniae as its starting point, this essay examines the translation, reworking and transmission […]

  • Lay Morality, Clerical Immorality, and Pilgrimage in Tenth-Century Ireland

    4 July 2016 | 12:00 pm

    ‘Lay Morality, Clerical Immorality, and Pilgrimage in Tenth-Century Ireland: Cethrur Macclérech and Epscop do Gáedelaib’, Studia Hibernica 39 (2013), 9-48 The subject of this essay is a pair of medieval Irish ecclesiastical anecdotes, namely Cethrur macclérech (‘Four Junior Clerics’) and Epscop do Gáedelaib (‘A Bishop of the Gaels’). Insofar as they have received any scholarly attention, these […]

  • Sacrifice and Salvation in Echtgus Úa Cúanáin’s Poetic Treatise on the Eucharist

    4 July 2016 | 11:57 am

    ‘Sacrifice and Salvation in Echtgus Úa Cúanáin’s Poetic Treatise on the Eucharist’, in Envisioning Christ on the Cross: Ireland and the Early Medieval West, ed. J. Mullins, J. Ní Ghrádaigh & R. Hawtree (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013), pp. 181-94 This essay discusses the use of the Passion narrative in Echtgus Úa Cúanáin’s Middle Irish poetic […]

  • The Authorship and Transmission of De tribus habitaculis animae

    4 July 2016 | 11:50 am

    ‘The Authorship and Transmission of De tribus habitaculis animae’, Journal of Medieval Latin 22 (2012), 49-65 This study argues that Aubrey Gwynn’s attribution of the Latin treatise De tribus habitaculis animae to Patrick of Dublin (d. 1084) is not supported by the manuscript evidence or the early transmission of the text. It is argued that, in the […]

  • Eschatological Justice in Scéla laí brátha

    4 July 2016 | 11:45 am

    ‘Eschatological Justice in Scéla laí brátha‘, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 59 (2010), 39-54 The Middle Irish homily ‘Scéla laí brátha’ explicates the ‘Eschatological Discourse’ of Matthew 25:34-45. This study argues that the homily’s understanding of the events of the eschaton is strongly influenced by Augustinian thought. The presentation of heaven as predominantly urban, with the elect portrayed […]

  • Neoplatonic Thought in Medieval Ireland: the Evidence of Scéla na esérgi

    3 July 2016 | 8:45 pm

    ‘Neoplatonic Thought in Medieval Ireland: the Evidence of Scéla na esérgi’, Medium Ævum 78 (2009), 216-230. This study of the Middle Irish eschatological sermon ‘Scéla na esérgi’ argues that it uses Irish vocabulary, transposed or translated from Latin, to articulate a philosophy of the general resurrection of mankind which is derived from Christian Neoplatonism. This article won […]