Category Archives: Eschatology

  • The Rhetoric and Reality of Reform in Irish Eschatological Thought, c. 1000 – 1150

    5 July 2016 | 12:39 pm

    ‘The Rhetoric and Reality of Reform in Irish Eschatological Thought, c. 1000 – 1150’, History of Religions 55:3 (2016), 269-88 This essay challenges the ideas that the ‘great fear’ recorded in Irish annals for the year 1096 was the culmination of an escalating rhetoric of apocalypticism, and that it was a trigger for the ecclesiastical reform […]

  • De tribus habitaculis animae: Concerning the Three Dwelling-Places of the Soul

    5 July 2016 | 11:43 am

    English translation of the Latin treatise De tribus habitaculis animae. (Note that the PDF published here is of the pre-publication proofs.) De_tribus_habitaculis_animae_Concerning

  • The Authorship and Transmission of De tribus habitaculis animae

    4 July 2016 | 11:50 am

    ‘The Authorship and Transmission of De tribus habitaculis animae’, Journal of Medieval Latin 22 (2012), 49-65 This study argues that Aubrey Gwynn’s attribution of the Latin treatise De tribus habitaculis animae to Patrick of Dublin (d. 1084) is not supported by the manuscript evidence or the early transmission of the text. It is argued that, in the […]

  • Eschatological Justice in Scéla laí brátha

    4 July 2016 | 11:45 am

    ‘Eschatological Justice in Scéla laí brátha‘, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 59 (2010), 39-54 The Middle Irish homily ‘Scéla laí brátha’ explicates the ‘Eschatological Discourse’ of Matthew 25:34-45. This study argues that the homily’s understanding of the events of the eschaton is strongly influenced by Augustinian thought. The presentation of heaven as predominantly urban, with the elect portrayed […]

  • Neoplatonic Thought in Medieval Ireland: the Evidence of Scéla na esérgi

    3 July 2016 | 8:45 pm

    ‘Neoplatonic Thought in Medieval Ireland: the Evidence of Scéla na esérgi’, Medium Ævum 78 (2009), 216-230. This study of the Middle Irish eschatological sermon ‘Scéla na esérgi’ argues that it uses Irish vocabulary, transposed or translated from Latin, to articulate a philosophy of the general resurrection of mankind which is derived from Christian Neoplatonism. This article won […]